Connect with us

Health

University of the Virgin Islands Launches Construction of Innovative Nursing School at St. Croix Campus

Published

on

A groundbreaking ceremony marked a historic moment at the University of the Virgin Islands’ St. Croix campus, where a new nursing school is set to be established. The event saw University President Dr. David Hall and key figures from the executive and legislative branches, as well as UVI faculty and staff, gather to celebrate this pivotal advancement in nursing education within the territory.

Dr. Hall highlighted the critical role of federal legislation in alleviating the debt of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), which facilitated financial freedom for UVI. This fiscal liberation allowed for reinvestment in the university, with the nursing school project being a prime example. He emphasized the collaborative effort between various government levels and non-government entities in making this project a reality.

Positioned adjacent to UVI’s state-of-the-art medical simulation center, the nursing school aims to foster an integrated training environment for medical and nursing students. Dr. Hall envisions a future where healthcare professionals are trained in collaborative teams to deliver optimal patient care.

The project’s swift initiation, driven by the enthusiasm of architect Renee D’Adamo and contractor D. S. & R Construction, LLC, reflects the commitment of all stakeholders. With an 18-month timeline, the groundbreaking event was a testament to the urgency and importance of this educational facility.

V.I. Department of Health’s Justa Encarnacion, an alumna of UVI, expressed her delight at the project’s commencement. Her message to nursing students emphasized the broad scope of opportunities in nursing, citing her own career trajectory as an example. The new facility is anticipated to enhance UVI’s already robust nursing education, nurturing future generations of skilled nursing professionals.

Former senator Kurt Vialet commended the territory’s nursing students for their consistent excellence, particularly in licensing examinations. He believes that the new nursing school in St. Croix will further strengthen the nursing workforce, contributing significantly to the improvement of healthcare delivery on the island.

Lieutenant Governor Tregenza Roach connected the new nursing school to the broader healthcare transformation across the territory. He referenced recent developments like the Charlotte Kimelman Cancer Institute and the Cardiac Center at Juan F Luis hospital, expressing optimism that these advancements, along with the nursing school, will substantially address the healthcare needs of the Virgin Islands and neighboring regions in the Caribbean.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Health

Experts Warn of Marijuana’s Long-Term Damage to Brain and Developing Fetuses Amid Push for Reclassification

Published

on

The Biden administration’s recent proposal to reclassify marijuana as a Schedule III drug, equating it with substances like anabolic steroids and Tylenol with codeine, has ignited a contentious debate. While supporters assert that this reclassification would offer tax advantages and invigorate the cannabis industry, health experts caution about the severe negative impacts of marijuana use.

Rising Marijuana Use and Legalization Trends

A 2022 survey sponsored by the National Institutes of Health revealed that 28.8% of Americans aged 19 to 30 had used marijuana in the previous month, a rate more than three times higher than cigarette use in the same age group. Among adults aged 35 to 50, 17.3% reported using marijuana, compared to 12.2% who smoked cigarettes. Although marijuana remains federally illegal, it is now authorized for recreational use in 24 states and for medical purposes in 14 additional states.

Health Risks and Addiction

Bertha Madras, a psychobiology professor at Harvard Medical School and a leading authority on marijuana, strongly opposes the reclassification. In a recent opinion piece for the Wall Street Journal, she stated, “It’s a political decision, not a scientific one. And it’s a tragic one.” Madras, who has spent 60 years studying psychoactive drugs, underscores the high addiction potential of marijuana, especially among young people. About 30% of cannabis users develop some degree of use disorder, compared to 13.5% of alcohol users. Madras emphasizes that marijuana use is primarily aimed at intoxication and notes that academic performance and college completion rates are significantly lower among marijuana users than alcohol drinkers.

Cognitive Impairment and Driving Risks

Marijuana use significantly impairs cognitive function and driving safety. Unlike alcohol, there are no established medical “cutoff points” to determine when it’s safe to drive after using marijuana. States with legal marijuana have reported increased car accidents. “Marijuana just sits there and promotes brain adaptation,” explains Madras, noting that the substance remains in the brain much longer than alcohol.

High-Potency Marijuana and Mental Health

The potency of today’s cannabis is far greater than it was 30 years ago, with significantly higher levels of THC, the main psychoactive component. This increased potency elevates the risks of marijuana use, including anxiety, depression, impaired memory, and cannabis hyperemesis syndrome—a condition characterized by severe vomiting due to prolonged use. Madras points to evidence suggesting that cannabis can induce schizophrenia. A study of 6.9 million Danes indicated that up to 30% of schizophrenia diagnoses in young men could have been prevented if they had not become dependent on marijuana. She highlights that users of other potent recreational drugs develop chronic psychosis at much lower rates compared to marijuana users.

Impact on Pregnant Women and Children

The growing use of marijuana among pregnant women is another major concern. Marijuana use during pregnancy has been linked to higher rates of preterm births, neonatal intensive care unit admissions, lower birth weights, and smaller head circumferences. THC, the active ingredient in cannabis, crosses the placenta and affects fetal brain development. Adolescents exposed to THC in utero exhibit increased aggressive behavior, cognitive dysfunction, and symptoms of ADHD and OCD.

Lack of Medicinal Benefits

Despite widespread claims about marijuana’s medicinal benefits, Madras has found strong evidence supporting its use only for neuropathic pain. For other types of pain and conditions, high-quality trials do not provide robust evidence of benefits. She compares the current promotion of marijuana to the marketing of opioids, where benefits are exaggerated and risks minimized.

The Call for Rigorous Research

Madras disputes the claim that cannabis cannot be adequately studied while classified as a Schedule I substance. She has successfully researched THC despite the additional regulatory paperwork. Madras calls on wealthy donors and advocates to fund rigorous clinical trials instead of ballot initiatives.

Conclusion

Reclassifying marijuana would not legalize its recreational use under federal law but would enable businesses to deduct expenses and culturally signal that marijuana use is normal. Madras warns that this sets a dangerous precedent and undermines efforts to prevent addiction. “This is not a war on drugs,” she asserts. “It’s a defense of the human brain at every possible age from in utero to old age.”

The debate over marijuana reclassification highlights the need to carefully weigh potential benefits against the significant health risks outlined by experts like Madras.

Continue Reading

Health

USVI Wellness Fair to Offer Comprehensive Free Health Services

Published

on

The 2024 USVI Wellness Fair is set to bring a plethora of free dental, optometry, and medical screenings to the territory next month. Nearly 300 healthcare professionals and support staff will participate in this extensive health initiative. The announcement was made during Monday’s Government House press briefing by territorial epidemiologist Dr. Tai Hunte-Cesar.

A collaboration among the Department of Health, the Office of the Governor, and the Department of Defense’s Innovative Readiness Training (IRT) Program, the initiative aims to provide essential health services at no cost to residents. Dr. Hunte-Cesar highlighted that this is the second such mission to the territory, recalling a successful deployment last August where a 20-person medical team conducted nearly 800 pediatric procedures.

From June 1 through June 9, residents can access a wide range of services. Dental care will include exams, cleanings, fillings, and extractions. Optometry services will cover both routine and emergency eye exams, retinal evaluations, school vision screenings, and the provision of prescription eyeglasses. Additionally, the fair will offer screenings for blood pressure, glucose, and cholesterol levels, mental wellness assessments, and pediatric services such as physicals and vaccinations.

Air Force Major Miu Zhang, who is in charge of this year’s mission, explained the dual benefits of the initiative. Launched in 1992, the IRT program not only provides critical training opportunities for military personnel but also delivers vital services to American communities. Major Zhang referred to the effort as a “win-win” situation.

The services will be offered on a first-come, first-serve basis, with special consideration given to the elderly and individuals with disabilities through dedicated early morning slots. Although not mandatory, pre-registration is highly recommended and will be available starting May 20 via an online portal.

Adult services will be conducted at the Ivanna Eudora Kean High School gymnasium on St. Thomas and the Educational Complex school gymnasium on St. Croix. Pediatric care will be hosted at the Department of Health’s maternal and child health clinics.

Operating hours are scheduled from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on weekdays, 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on Saturdays, and 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Sundays. The fair will conclude on Sunday, June 9, with a special session from 9 a.m. to noon dedicated to connecting individuals with further care and services available within the territory.

Continue Reading

Health

Virgin Islands Health Department Alerts Public to Dengue Fever Amid Regional Outbreak

Published

on

Amid concerns over a dengue fever outbreak in Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands Department of Health is urging residents to be vigilant in recognizing and responding to the symptoms of this mosquito-borne disease. The call to action follows the confirmation of three cases of dengue fever within the territory, sparking fears of a potential increase in cases.

Health Commissioner Justa Encarnacion emphasized the critical need for public education on the similarities and differences between the symptoms of dengue fever and COVID-19. With both diseases presenting similar early symptoms, Encarnacion underscored the importance of early detection and appropriate medical consultation.

“Dengue and COVID-19 share early signs, but understanding and distinguishing the unique symptoms of dengue is crucial for timely and effective treatment,” Encarnacion stated. She outlined the typical symptoms of dengue fever as fever, nausea, vomiting, rash, and pains in the eye, muscles, joints, or bones. These symptoms generally last from two to seven days, with most people recovering within a week.

The Health Commissioner provided guidance on managing dengue symptoms, advising against the use of aspirin or ibuprofen and recommending acetaminophen instead. She stressed the importance of seeking medical advice and undergoing a blood test if symptoms appear.

The Aedes aegypti mosquito, which is most active at dawn and dusk, is identified as the primary carrier of the dengue virus. In light of the outbreak, residents are advised to eliminate standing water around their homes and use EPA-approved repellents to prevent mosquito bites and breeding.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has warned that severe dengue can develop in about 5% of cases, posing a higher risk to infants, pregnant women, and individuals who have previously contracted dengue. Symptoms of severe dengue, including abdominal pain, persistent vomiting, and bleeding from the nose or gums, require immediate medical attention.

This advisory comes as Puerto Rico declares a state of emergency following a record 549 cases of dengue reported this year. The Virgin Islands Department of Health remains proactive in its efforts to prevent a similar surge in cases, advocating for community awareness and adherence to prevention measures.

Continue Reading

Trending