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Former Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms to Address UVI Graduates at 60th Commencement

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Keisha Lance Bottoms, celebrated public figure and former Atlanta Mayor. Courtesy of the University of the Virgin Islands.

The University of the Virgin Islands has proudly announced that Keisha Lance Bottoms, the esteemed former Mayor of Atlanta and previous senior advisor in the White House Office of Public Engagement, will grace its 60th Commencement Ceremonies as the keynote speaker. These milestone events are set to unfold on May 9 at the Orville E. Kean Campus on St. Thomas, and on May 10 at the Albert A. Sheen Campus on St. Croix, with both commencements beginning at 1:00 p.m.

Bottoms, whose career spans various echelons of government, made significant strides during her mayoral tenure beginning January 2, 2018. She adeptly steered Atlanta through tumultuous times, including the Covid-19 pandemic and the zenith of the racial justice movement, underscoring her pivotal role in tackling pressing urban issues and seizing opportunities within the United States.

The University of the Virgin Islands commends Lance Bottoms for her leadership, which propelled Atlanta towards notable economic resilience and growth amidst the pandemic’s challenges. Notably, her administration achieved balanced budgets across four years without increasing property taxes or reducing city personnel, all while bolstering city reserves to a robust $181 million. Her time in office was characterized by economic advancements for Atlanta, highlighted by the attraction of nine Fortune 500 company headquarters and the execution of initiatives aimed at systemic reforms to improve the lives of city residents.

Lance Bottoms’ administration made headline-worthy strides, including repurposing Atlanta’s jail into a center for diversion, abolishing cash bail for non-violent crimes, and the creation of over 7,000 affordable housing units. Her leadership was pivotal in advancing diversity and inclusion, through the establishment of new police and fire stations and substantial law enforcement reforms.

With Dr. David Hall, who is concluding a remarkable 15-year tenure as UVI President, at the helm, the university looks forward to Lance Bottoms sharing her journey and insights. Her story of impactful leadership and dedication to fostering an equitable and inclusive society is set to inspire the Class of 2024.

Keisha Lance Bottoms’ illustrious career and dedication to public service have garnered her widespread acclaim, including being named a Distinguished Civil Rights Advocate by the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, one of Glamour Magazine’s Women of the Year, and securing a spot in Ebony Magazine’s Power 100 List.

As the daughter of R&B legend Major Lance, Keisha Lance Bottoms shares her life with her husband Derek Bottoms and their four children, embodying the roles of a committed public servant, spouse, and parent with grace and dedication.

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Education

USVI Elementary and Middle Schools Celebrate Student Promotions at Annual Ceremonies

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Graduation season has begun across the U.S. Virgin Islands, with several schools hosting promotional ceremonies to celebrate their students’ academic achievements and transitions. On Monday, St. Croix’s Claude O. Markoe, Pearl B. Larsen, and Alfredo Andrews Schools held their ceremonies, while Jane E. Tuitt Elementary School and Yvonne E. Milliner-Bowsky Elementary School did the same on St. Thomas.

The communities of Pearl B. Larsen and Claude O. Markoe Schools gathered to mark their students’ transitions to high school and middle school. These ceremonies highlighted the students’ past successes and anticipated their future academic journeys.

Claude O. Markoe School celebrated the promotion of 47 sixth-grade students to middle school at the St. Croix Educational Complex High School. Meanwhile, Pearl B. Larsen hosted its event in its home auditorium, where 47 eighth-grade students were honored as they prepared to enter high school.

Alumni from both schools delivered keynote speeches, sharing their experiences and memories from their own school days. Jayda Brown, a Pearl B. Larsen alumna and keynote speaker, recounted how her eighth-grade promotional ceremony had been held virtually. As she prepares to graduate from St. Croix Central High School, Brown reflected on the resilience and adaptability gained during that time. “We may have missed out on the traditional ceremony, but we gained something far more valuable: resilience, adaptability, and the knowledge that we can overcome any obstacle life throws our way,” she said, encouraging the students to carry these skills forward.

Pearl B. Larsen also recognized its top honors students, Nyack Nathaniel and Zayden Turner, for their academic and personal achievements. Assistant Principal Anna Marie Gordon praised them as “intelligent, athletic, [and] humble,” and as examples of perseverance and passion. “I’m so proud that they are young men leading the class,” she remarked.

Dr. Etta Lee Pickering-Mitchell, an alumna of Claude O. Markoe School, reflected on the influence of her elementary school teachers on her academic journey. As the Assistant Principal of Eulalie Rivera School, she addressed the promoted students, emphasizing that their “real work begins now.”

While Claude O. Markoe did not designate first or second honors students, the school celebrated another significant achievement: all six students recommended for the St. Croix Educational Complex High School’s magnet program were accepted. “I’m so happy to hear that all the students who participated in the interview process were able to get accepted. That speaks volumes about the teachers’ dedication to preparing students for the future,” said Dr. Pickering-Mitchell.

Dr. Pickering-Mitchell expressed her optimism for the future, stating, “I love to celebrate the small successes, and I look forward to seeing what they’re going to do in the future.”

In her closing remarks, Pearl B. Larsen’s Principal Joanna Brow commended the promoted class for their exemplary behavior, noting, “They are one of our best eighth-grade classes,” and praised the students’ collective achievements to the gathered parents.

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Career and Technical Education Faces Hurdles Due to Underfunding and Agency Delays, Board Reports

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The Board of Career and Technical Education (CTE) is facing significant challenges in fulfilling its mandate due to chronic underfunding and delays from partner agencies. CTE Chair Joane Murphy highlighted these issues during a testimony before the Committee on Education and Workforce Development on Thursday.

Ms. Murphy stated that the board’s main responsibilities include establishing, maintaining, and supervising vocational schools. However, despite being legally empowered to do so, the board lacks the authority to enforce these provisions effectively.

A key issue is the board’s reliance on other agencies for critical aspects of its mandate. The Department of Education is tasked with developing curricula, but the CTE board has not been kept informed about curriculum development relevant to its mission. “The board has not yet received those documents for further scrutiny and ultimate approval,” Ms. Murphy explained, noting a two-year delay. This lack of enforcement capability hampers the board’s ability to fulfill its duties.

The information gap from the Education Department impedes the CTE board’s efforts to attract more participants to its programs, which aim to enhance career prospects for youth and adults. The board’s plans include restructuring school hours to integrate workforce experience in the mornings and academic classes in the afternoons. They also propose breaking down two-year programs into smaller, more manageable segments. However, without the ability to enforce its mandate, these plans remain theoretical.

Ms. Murphy emphasized the need for additional funding. Federal Perkins Act funds can no longer be used for travel expenses, making it difficult for students to attend important conferences that offer scholarships, certifications, and networking opportunities.

Ms. Murphy also criticized the V.I. Legislature for its role in the lack of progress on CTE initiatives. Former Senator Genevieve Whitaker’s Bill 34-0378, intended to establish the Career and Technical Education Training Fund, failed to advance beyond its initial committee hearing in November 2022. This fund would have provided direct financial support to the board. Committee chair Marise James pledged to revisit the proposal during Thursday’s hearing.

Despite these challenges, Ms. Murphy affirmed the CTE Board’s commitment to maximizing available resources and collaborating with stakeholders to positively impact the career and technical education landscape.

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U.S. Territories Highlight Colonial Educational Challenges Impacting Local Identity

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At a recent gathering in the U.S. Virgin Islands, experts from various U.S. territories discussed the significant educational challenges they face due to their colonial relationship with the United States. This forum, sponsored by Right to Democracy, the Radical Education & Advocacy League, and WTJX, addressed the systemic issues hindering educational progress across these regions.

Jessica Samuel, co-founder of the Radical Education and Advocacy League in the USVI, identified three critical areas of concern: infrastructure, curriculum, and quality of life. She emphasized the bureaucratic hurdles stemming from the territories’ complicated ties with the federal government and pointed out the lingering infrastructural damages from the 2017 hurricanes that still affect students today. Samuel stressed the necessity for a curriculum that incorporates local history and culture, which she believes is currently lacking due to the territories’ “colonial predicament.”

Furthermore, Samuel highlighted the profound impact of poverty on educational success, noting a direct correlation between poverty levels and the quality of education accessible to students, particularly in the USVI where a third of children live below the poverty line.

Georgina Candal-Segurola, representing Puerto Rico, discussed corruption issues and the U.S. Department of Education’s inadequate oversight, which she feels has contributed to persistent poor conditions in education on the island. Despite federal efforts to reform, she reported local resistance, particularly in decentralizing the Puerto Rico Department of Education, has hindered progress.

Panelists from Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands voiced concerns about the U.S.-centric curriculums that overshadow local knowledge and identity. Leila Staffler, secretary of Labor in NMI, criticized how educational systems encourage familiarity with American geography over local culture, which she believes undermines local identity and sustains political status quos.

Donna L. Enguerra-Simpson from American Samoa touched on the emotional and cultural impacts of prioritizing English over native languages in educational settings. Despite similar attempts in Puerto Rico, Spanish has remained prevalent, serving as a cultural stronghold against such policies.

In conclusion, the panelists collectively called for a reassessment of the legislative frameworks governing education in the territories. Ms. Samuel advocated for clarity in educational policies and statutes to ensure they are streamlined and reflective of current best practices, aiming to enhance the quality and relevance of education in the territories.

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